On: Sho Madjozi

Ahead of her first appearance at Oppikoppi, Sho Madjozi speaks to Helen Herimbi about creativity, culture and competition A few weeks after we’ve had the following interview, I’m talking to Sho Madjozi behind the stage at the Global Citizen press conference, where Beyonce has been announced as the headliner for the concert. A girl who looks barely out of her teens interrupts our conversation to say: “I love you so much. You are my biggest inspiration.” Her arms are already around Sho Madjozi’s waist and her ponytail rests on Sho Madjozi’s chest when the girl remembers to ask: “Can I hug you?” Before Sho Madjozi has responded, the girl continues: “Okay, let me tell you my story.” Sure, the girl has no boundaries and needs to be taught about consent, but the way that Sho Madjozi embraces her reminds me that the rapper who has taken the nation by storm by simply being herself is giving others – particularly women who are younger than she is – permission to be themselves too. A few weeks before this press conference – where she makes it clear that African youth are tired of being portrayed as poor and needy and that they also deserve nice things – we are sitting in the sun at a table outside a Melville eatery. I need the sun because it’s chilly. She needs it because she’s hungover. She’s telling me: “I’ve never been to Oppi and the first time I go is as a performer and it’s in Limpopo, how lit is that?” Sporting a T-shirt featuring African barbershop-style drawings of her face in her many popular hairstyles, the Dumi Hi Phone star is in a good mood despite being “in that second part of the hangover, after you think you are fine but you’re not”. She’s just come back from a shoot with major brand that she stays mum about. A couple of weeks later, we find out that she was shooting with Trace as she is the music television channel’s new mobile ambassador. Sho Madjozi is getting paid extremely well for bringing XiTsonga tradition Read More …