On: DJ Vetkuk vs Mahoota

DJ Vetkuk vs Mahoota speak to Helen Herimbi about what it took to get to this version of their newest album, Local Everywhere Mahoota’s cellphone rests atop a physical copy of Spikiri’s new album, King Don Father. Both Mahoota and Spikiri are part of revered kwaito group Trompies, and I point at the CD and mention how good the music is. “It’s sold out now in stores,” Mahoota smiles proudly. “So it is very good.” This exchange is significant to me because it, in a moment, lays to rest the rumours that Mahoota no longer wants to be a part of Trompies since he is rarely seen with the rest of the group for interviews and appearances. It also shows there is room for everyone to be their full selves in the music industry as, right now, Mahoota, his music compadre of 17 years, DJ Vetkuk, and I are enjoying tea in the fleeting sunshine of a chilly Joburg day and talking about their new album. The pair began their DJ Vetkuk vs Mahoota compilation series in 2001 and have since released five original albums. Their latest, Local Everywhere, was released this month. It’s a double-disc of gqom, house and trap with features that range from Busiswa to Nokwazi to Black Motion, Heavy K, Sjava, Lady Zamar and, of course, Kwesta, who features on three songs including current single, Ziwa Murtu. That song was the last one that the K1 Gawd recorded and Mahoota is so impressed by his ability to think on the spot that he shows me a video on his phone of Kwesta’s creative process. Both Vetkuk and Mahoota watch the video and smile as though it’s the first time they are seeing it. In the five years since the release of their last album, Dinaledi, DJ Vetkuk vs Mahoota has recorded over 500 songs. And even the 22 tracks that did make it on to Local Everywhere underwent multiple changes before they became the versions we hear today. Take, for instance, Zimnandi featuring Heavy K, Sjava and Fire. “We went through so many things to have Read More …