On: Heavy K

As he prepares his fourth album, Heavy K talks to Helen Herimbi about how straddling the line between tragedy and triumph became his comfort zone AS A single polarising figure in dance music, Mkhululi “Heavy K” Siqula lives in two worlds at once. When he walks into the restaurant, he swaggers in with a confidence that belies his softspoken nature. He wears Riky Rick’s Cotton Club Records trucker cap and many beaded necklaces around the collar of his golf shirt. On his right wrist, four beaded bands nestle closely together. On his left, he wears a gaudy gold watch and two gigantic gilded rings on his forefinger and ring finger. It’s like he’s trying to merge the flashy with the grounded, like he’s just trying to be himself in public. And with a banging brand new single, Siphum’ elokshin, under his belt, this father of two boys is finally ready to show the world how he became that way. Siphum’ elokshin, which features the powerful voice of Mondli Ngcobo, with a tinge of auto tune here, is about rising above trying circumstances by virtue of one being from the township. “Growing up in PE is one of the things I am grateful for,” he tells me once he’s taken a seat. It’s the typical upbringing where violence and crime are rife in the neighbourhood. In an attempt to protect him from reality, his mother would often pretend she is taking a break from eating meat whenever he would ask her why his and the plates of his father and brother have a small piece and hers has none at all. But things changed when he turned 16. “My brother sent me to go ask for some movies on a USB stick,” Heavy K recalls, “and then I met this producer called Kwesta. I instantly fell in love with music. Even though I had plans to be a scientist, the music was always calling me.” Life changed “The law of attraction was important to me because I used to dream so much back in those days,” he continues. “Everything that I Read More …

On: Heavy K

At just 23 years old, Heavy K is fast approaching legendary status. The house producer took Helen Herimbi through some of the highlights of his second album. ‘Heavy K doesn’t know when his album will be released because he keeps making news songs and trying to add them to the album,” exclaims Kalawa Jazmee’s Sina on the other end of the phone. He’s not lying. When photographer Thuli Mbatha and I arrive at Heavy K’s mini mansion in Midrand around noon, he’s still asleep. Sox, whom you might remember from this year’s Big Brother Mzansi, is under a blanket on the couch. He, too, has been asleep. Wiping what’s left of a dream from his eyes, he tells us Heavy K and the boys didn’t get any shut-eye until after four that morning. The producer who was born Mkhululi Siqula was up all night making music. Will it appear on his second album, Respect the Drumboss 2015? Sox smiles and says: “Maybe.” After a while, the young gun who broke into the music scene with the hit, Wena, featuring Mpumi, comes outside to meet us. “I’m done with the album,” he says as he poses for Thuli. “It’s a double album and as we’re talking, the songs are being mastered in Cape Town.” The album is meant to have 22-tracks, but “last week, I did a song with Speedy and thought, ‘maybe Riky Rick can do something here’. Even though I’m done, it’s like when you’re cooking, but you keep adding spices.” Music is the food of life after all, and the song featuring Riky and Speedy is probably going to play on and on this summer. It’s about a fly chick shaking what her momma gave her and the beat has a quick drum pattern that borrows from marimba. Heavy K doesn’t seem like a flashy guy, but he insists on being photographed on his Mercedes-Benz C63 – you know, the model Cassper Nyovest wants and wishes he could tell us why. The luminous yellow car was Heavy K’s dream car and is an extension of his quest to Read More …