On: Muzi

Following the release of his new album, Muzi speaks to Helen Herimbi about being alternative and Africans in space His rolled-up spottie. That’s about the only thing that’s predictable about the producer, songwriter, singer who simply goes by the name of Muzi. Sometimes it’s black. Other times it’s a military green. But it is always rolled up to just above his ears and way above his eyebrows. The uniform helps to identify the 27-year-old artist who was born Muzi Mazibuko, but that’s where it ends. His music is ever changing. First, he was entrenched in the glossy trappings of mainstream rap. “I used to make beats for rappers when I was like 19-years-old,” he tells me when I sit down with him for coffee. “So I would make beats for people like JR, Psyfo, Kabelo Mabalane and others. I made that Muntu song for JR, I did work for Reason, and when Cassper performed at the Metros (Awards), and there was that Doc Shebeleza edit at the end, I made that. I made a remix for Amantombazane for Riky Rick – which he used to open his performance sets,” he says, nonchalantly. But that didn’t go very well for him. Muzi wasn’t entirely in his element. “It didn’t go well because I didn’t like the dynamic of making stuff and having to wait to get paid and stuff like that,” he admits. “So in 2013, I started doing my own stuff. I started DJing.” He still calls KwaZulu-Natal’s Empangeni township home but had moved to Jozi to make beats. “Then I found out this is where your heart can get broken,” he swings his chain when he says this. Then he went back home, worked on a solo career that led him to live in Berlin and then this March, he only officially moved back to Joburg. While drinking a grande cappuccino – which he admits is bad for him – Muzi laughs easily about the milestones in his musical journey. His signature spottie is firmly planted on his head and if our conversation is anything to go by, he’s Read More …