On: LeAnne

With a stellar but slept-on album under her belt, LeAnne Dlamini continues to enjoy every waking moment, writes Helen Herimbi It’s a tiny nod to Kendrick Lamar. It’s also a part of her T-shirt line. But when a fresh-faced LeAnne Dlamini takes a seat in the booth opposite me, scrawled across the front of her tee is a statement about her work ethic: Be Humble, Sit Down. Humility was instilled in LeAnne – as she is professionally known – from a young age. She started singing in her church choir at 13 years old and, three years later, she was leading praise and worship. It was that year, while studying music at the National School of the Arts, that Loyiso Bala heard her sing during a service and recruited her to become his backing vocalist. “It was the time when TKZee Family was really huge and Loyiso had just come out with, I think it was Musuk’ukhala, and he was just the hottest thing ever, right,” LeAnne laughs. “So yes, I did completely lose my mind. Then things happened very naturally. I think it was just God-ordained.” “They had to ask permission from my parents for me to go to studio because I was 16,” she says of an era where she sang with the likes of Danny K and Kabelo Mabalane. Back then, producer-extraordinaire, Alexis Faku started booking her for other sessions. He has been her producer ever since. The flame that is LeAnne’s latest album, Warrior, was prematurely extinguished because she put it out under Mabala Noise when the now defunct record company was signing everyone and their aunts. But out of those ashes, her latest single, Patch It Up, has become her phoenix. While most songs on Warrior are produced by Faku, Patch It Up was originally written by Antonio Dixon for Toni Braxton, living legend. The mid-tempo ditty sees LeAnne sing about Saturday being the worst day to fight and being willing to fix a relationship that is going awry. I ask her what her remedy is for a relationship in bad shape. “I’m still trying Read More …